jasric:

The only green lantern that matters to me:) I mean I like hal but john is so badass!! I desperately want him in a movie! (on deviantART here too [x])

wolfish-willow:

Title: Friends Just Can’t be Found 1/?
Author: wolfish_willow
Characters/Pairing: Kurt, Blaine // Eventual Kadam
Warnings: Unbeta’d // Not Blaine friendly
Word Count: ~1,050 words
Summary: The Warblers have found the one thing Kurt isn’t willing to ‘compromise’ about. Blaine tries to make Kurt ‘see reason’ and Kurt, well. Let’s just say the blinders have finally come off.

Notes: I was reading some old fics and a couple things kind of clicked in my head. Words started happening so while the credits were rolling on a movie I had playing in the background, I actually opened a doc and started typing it out. It came out at a little less than 800 words so I went back and did what I could to get it to 1k words before posting it. I’m actually… happy with it.

First time posting Glee fic, I’m crazy nervous you don’t even know (or maybe you do). No Adam yet, this part is just Kurt and Blaine. But he’ll be showing up in the next part, I’m sure. (I’m not sure, though, when that part will be written/posted). I apologize for the WIP. I just really wanted to share.

Title from Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel (and also might change at some point).

Sorry for the too long notes, too. Just um. Happy reading?

                                                  oOo

The sound of the door slamming shut behind him does little to quell Kurt’s anger. It does, just the slightest bit, soothe his inner diva. He hasn’t been free to express himself like this in… A long time. Too long. Since before he even came to Dalton, really.

Rachel will be impressed.

Read More

mvgl:

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 2x09 - “Cased Up” (November 11, 1991)

illbeoutback:

If you’re protesting abortion, the Supreme Court says you can get right in women’s faces and scream at them on their way into the clinic. Because freedom of speech.

But if you try and protest the murder of a black man, you get tear gas fired at you.

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?
It’s not what you think
I gave it away in the third pic
That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…
imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?
It’s not what you think
I gave it away in the third pic
That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?

It’s not what you think

I gave it away in the third pic

That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

(Source: fierybeams)

"Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue."
cartoonpolitics:

"There’s a reason you separate military and the police. One fights the enemies of the state. The other serves and protects the people. When the military becomes both, then the enemies of the state tend to become the people." .. (Commander Adama, Battlestar Galactica)

cartoonpolitics:

"There’s a reason you separate military and the police. One fights the enemies of the state. The other serves and protects the people. When the military becomes both, then the enemies of the state tend to become the people." .. (Commander Adama, Battlestar Galactica)

torisoulphoenix:

avoidgettingread:

Do not wear contact lenses if you are in a situation where you may be tear-gassed.  When I went through basic training, we were warned that there was a possibility the tear gas they were using could melt contact lenses.

BOOOOOOOOOOOST!!!!!!!!!!

princemono:

VERIFIED FUNDRAISERS:
aforementioned #operationhelporhush: the starter’s twitter, teepsring shop, amazon wishlist, paypal, 
and Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund
Feed the Students of Ferguson (source: starter’s twitter St. Louis Foodbank Confirmation)
i have been seeing a lot of different links for different places to donate for bail and legal fees, but i haven’t been able to find anything on whether or not the funds have actually been going towards helping out the people of ferguson so
if you know of any more please add and spread them and if in doubt remember to google first
princemono:

VERIFIED FUNDRAISERS:
aforementioned #operationhelporhush: the starter’s twitter, teepsring shop, amazon wishlist, paypal, 
and Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund
Feed the Students of Ferguson (source: starter’s twitter St. Louis Foodbank Confirmation)
i have been seeing a lot of different links for different places to donate for bail and legal fees, but i haven’t been able to find anything on whether or not the funds have actually been going towards helping out the people of ferguson so
if you know of any more please add and spread them and if in doubt remember to google first

princemono:

VERIFIED FUNDRAISERS:

aforementioned #operationhelporhush: the starter’s twitterteepsring shop, amazon wishlist, paypal

and Michael Brown’s Memorial Fund

Feed the Students of Ferguson (source: starter’s twitter St. Louis Foodbank Confirmation)

i have been seeing a lot of different links for different places to donate for bail and legal fees, but i haven’t been able to find anything on whether or not the funds have actually been going towards helping out the people of ferguson so

if you know of any more please add and spread them and if in doubt remember to google first

(Source: peechingtonmariejust)

showthemwhat:

The tensions have been building for a long time, and even justice for Michael Brown won’t change that.

FERGUSON, Missouri—Talk to anyone in Ferguson and you’ll hear a story about the police. “One of my friends had a son killed by the Ferguson Police Department, about 10 years ago,” said Carl Walker, a Vietnam veteran and former parole officer who came to show his support for demonstrators in Ferguson. “They wouldn’t release the name of the officer who killed him. Why wouldn’t you release the name?”

“The cops said he shot at them—case closed,” said Al Cole, referring to a cousin who was killed by Ferguson police in 2000. “Even as a teenager, 13 or 14 years old, I’ve been slammed on police cars … now I try to avoid riding through Ferguson.”

“Some police say they saw me at a house, pulled me, said I fit a description, locked me up, and found out I was on parole,” said Craig Beck, who was watching demonstrators under the shade of a burned-out QuikTrip convenience store. “They said I threw a plastic baggie, which they didn’t have when they took me into custody.” He continues: “I beat the case, but you know, this isn’t new. This happens every day.”

Everyone—or at least, every black person—can recall an incident. Everyone can attest to friends and relatives who have been harassed, assaulted, or worse by the police.

Ferguson, Missouri August 18, 2014Demonstrators hold up roses while protesting the shooting death of Michael Brown on Aug. 18, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Perhaps one of the most disturbing cases was last year’s shooting of Cary Ball Jr., a 25-year-old black student at St. Louis Community College–Forest Park. The official police report is that Ball crashed his car after a high-speed chase, ran away, and aimed his weapon at officers after they confronted him. Witnesses say Ball had thrown his gun to the ground and was walking toward police—hands up—when he was shot and killed with 25 rounds. A federal investigation cleared the officers. Likewise, that February, surveillance video from a casino showed St. Louis police slamming a black man’s head into the bumper of a vehicle, after a dispute over gambling and trespassing. And in March of this year, a video showed St. Louis police officers beating a mentally disabled man in his home, after the family called police for help.

These weren’t isolated events. A 2012 report from University of Missouri–St. Louis criminologist David Klinger found that, from 2008 to 2011, St. Louis police officers fired their weapons 98 times. “Any comparison across cities right now is still missing the lion’s share of circumstances in which people are shot by the police,” Klingersaid to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “There are only a smattering of cities that report their officer-involved shootings, and when compared against them, St. Louis is on the high end.” The data on police violence is incomplete, as there is no federal effort to pull together information on unjustified homicides. But the anecdotes of brutality and excessive force out of St. Louis  and St. Louis County are rampant and often startling. In 2009, for example, a man was wrongly arrested, beaten by police, and subsequently charged for bleeding on their uniforms.

This abuse is so ubiquitous that the shooting of Michael Brown might seem like static against a backdrop of awfulness. But even for the area, Brown’s death was brutal. Which is why—in an otherwise quiet town in an otherwise quiet area—we’re dealing with an explosive fire that shows no signs of ending.

Click here for the remainder of the article